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Brain & Mental Health

Caring for Family

Career

Nutrition

Driving

Finances

Physical Health

Living Situations

Retirement

Sexual Health

Parenting Adult Children

Sleeping

Regardless of your age, all adults should get between 7-9 hours of sleep each night.   Despite these guidelines, many older adults report not getting enough sleep at night.  There are many reasons why older people tend to go to sleep early and get up early.   Did you know that oftentimes being in pain or taking certain medicines can keep you awake.  According to the National Institute on Aging, the results of sleep deprivation may bring about irritability, forgetfulness, depression and even falls.

We cannot stop the aging process - if we are fortunate - we get to live a long healthy life. We can make choices that improve our ability to maintain an active life, to do the things we enjoy, and to spend time with loved ones.

Once your children reach adulthood, your full time job as a parent can abruptly stop, and the longest period of your parenthood begins. This anxiety provoking stage of parenting begins in what Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, a developmental psychologist, calls “emerging adulthood,” from 18 to 29 years old. Julie Halpert points out that, “many factors can influence how this transition plays out, navigating this changing parent-child dynamic seems to be universally confusing.”

Some people see retirement as a reward - the result of working hard for so many years.  Others view retirement with dread, wondering how they will fill some many days with meaningful activities.  For so many there are more questions than answers.  Did you know that according to the U.S. Department of Labor, only half of Americans have calculated how much they need to save for retirement?  

A diverse, healthy diet can help reduce our risk of many chronic diseases as we age. According to longevity expert, Dr. Mark Hyman “food isn’t like medicine, food is medicine and is the number way we can create vibrant health.”

Perhaps you have heard, or experienced this your self but changes in your body as you age can impair your ability to drive safely.  Driving has long been considered an expression of independence.  Many of us waited a long time for the keys to a car. Once doing all the hard work to get our license, many of us are understandably reluctant to let them go. None of us wants to be dependent on someone else when we are ready to go out. Together we can learn more about the different factors that can affect driving as you age and signs of when it may be time to stop driving.

Living on a fixed income can be hard. As the cost of living goes up, your income does not always keep pace. Likewise, as science and behavior have allowed us to live longer, our savings have to be stretched longer to accommodate. It is now more important than ever for seniors to learn and practice skills for money management, avoiding scams, reducing debt, plan for possible increases in health care and prescriptions and maintaining health to reduce health care costs to make the money stretch through the lifespan.

Along with other challenges we can experience as we age, the dreaded “brain fog” is a common symptom of “getting older. Over the past several decades, there has been a shift in thinking of our brain health to define overall brain function, including the aging brain and preventive care viewpoints, to develop strategies to promote brain health through a life-course approach.

The human lifespan has increased with improvements in healthcare and living conditions.  While we celebrate living much longer than ever before, many of us acknowledge that living until an advanced age comes with its own unique share of challenges. Perhaps it will be you who will be caring for an older adult in your life.  Perhaps the person being cared for will be you. In either care, preparation for this phase of life is key to reducing the stress and anxiety this new stage of life can sometimes bring.

Many people work beyond the traditional retirement age of generations past. There is evidence that working past age 65 has multiple benefits beyond making money, “staying mentally, socially, and physically active — which working may enable you to do — is good for health.” (Harvard Review)

Regardless of your age, all adults should get between 7-9 hours of sleep each night.   Despite these guidelines, many older adults report not getting enough sleep at night.  There are many reasons why older people tend to go to sleep early and get up early.   Did you know that oftentimes being in pain or taking certain medicines can keep you awake.  According to the National Institute on Aging, the results of sleep deprivation may bring about irritability, forgetfulness, depression and even falls.

As you age, it doesn’t mean that you suddenly lose interest in sex. It’s common for people to remain sexually active throughout their lives. How your sex life changes as you age is largely up to you. Your body will change as you get older, and your sexual health will change, too. These changes may require you to adapt.

As someone ages, living arrangements can also change due to the loss of a long-time partner, financial responsibilities, adult children moving out or moving back in and the dynamic of sharing multigenerational homes together.

Mental Health

Along with other challenges we can experience as we age, the dreaded “brain fog” is a common symptom of “getting older. Over the past several decades, there has been a shift in thinking of our brain health to define overall brain function, including the aging brain and preventive care viewpoints, to develop strategies to promote brain health through a life-course approach.

Nutrition

A diverse, healthy diet can help reduce our risk of many chronic diseases as we age. According to longevity expert, Dr. Mark Hyman “food isn’t like medicine, food is medicine and is the number way we can create vibrant health.”

Physical Health

We cannot stop the aging process - if we are fortunate - we get to live a long healthy life. We can make choices that improve our ability to maintain an active life, to do the things we enjoy, and to spend time with loved ones.

Sexual Health

As you age, it doesn’t mean that you suddenly lose interest in sex. It’s common for people to remain sexually active throughout their lives. How your sex life changes as you age is largely up to you. Your body will change as you get older, and your sexual health will change, too. These changes may require you to adapt.

Sleeping

Regardless of your age, all adults should get between 7-9 hours of sleep each night.   Despite these guidelines, many older adults report not getting enough sleep at night.  There are many reasons why older people tend to go to sleep early and get up early.   Did you know that oftentimes being in pain or taking certain medicines can keep you awake.  According to the National Institute on Aging, the results of sleep deprivation may bring about irritability, forgetfulness, depression and even falls.

Caring for Family

The human lifespan has increased with improvements in healthcare and living conditions.  While we celebrate living much longer than ever before, many of us acknowledge that living until an advanced age comes with its own unique share of challenges. Perhaps it will be you who will be caring for an older adult in your life.  Perhaps the person being cared for will be you. In either care, preparation for this phase of life is key to reducing the stress and anxiety this new stage of life can sometimes bring.

Driving

Perhaps you have heard, or experienced this your self but changes in your body as you age can impair your ability to drive safely.  Driving has long been considered an expression of independence.  Many of us waited a long time for the keys to a car. Once doing all the hard work to get our license, many of us are understandably reluctant to let them go. None of us wants to be dependent on someone else when we are ready to go out. Together we can learn more about the different factors that can affect driving as you age and signs of when it may be time to stop driving.

Living Situations

As someone ages, living arrangements can also change due to the loss of a long-time partner, financial responsibilities, adult children moving out or moving back in and the dynamic of sharing multigenerational homes together.

Parent/Child relationships

Once your children reach adulthood, your full time job as a parent can abruptly stop, and the longest period of your parenthood begins. This anxiety provoking stage of parenting begins in what Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, a developmental psychologist, calls “emerging adulthood,” from 18 to 29 years old. Julie Halpert points out that, “many factors can influence how this transition plays out, navigating this changing parent-child dynamic seems to be universally confusing.”

Careers

Many people work beyond the traditional retirement age of generations past. There is evidence that working past age 65 has multiple benefits beyond making money, “staying mentally, socially, and physically active — which working may enable you to do — is good for health.” (Harvard Review)

Finances

Living on a fixed income can be hard. As the cost of living goes up, your income does not always keep pace. Likewise, as science and behavior have allowed us to live longer, our savings have to be stretched longer to accommodate. It is now more important than ever for seniors to learn and practice skills for money management, avoiding scams, reducing debt, plan for possible increases in health care and prescriptions and maintaining health to reduce health care costs to make the money stretch through the lifespan.

Retirement

Some people see retirement as a reward - the result of working hard for so many years.  Others view retirement with dread, wondering how they will fill some many days with meaningful activities.  For so many there are more questions than answers.  Did you know that according to the U.S. Department of Labor, only half of Americans have calculated how much they need to save for retirement?  

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